10
Dez
2005

WHAT IS A POLICE STATE?

//disc.server.com/discussion.cgi?id=149495;article=96613;show_parent=1

pass on.........

I recommend reading 1984 by George Orwell, help understand what is happening right now, your local library may have it... unless it was burned !

beefree


//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Police_states

George Orwell:

//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Orwell

A police state is a totalitarian state regulated by secret police; the police exercise power on behalf of the executive and the conduct of the police cannot be effectively challenged. In such regimes there is no significant distinction between the law and the will of the executive; there is no rule of law.

Under the political model of enlightened despotism, the ruler is the "highest servant of the state". The ruler exercises the absolute power that he enjoys to provide for the general welfare. All of the powers of the state are to be directed toward this end; to constrain the ruler with written law would be bad policy. This view was supported by such thinkers as Voltaire and Jean-Jacques Rousseau .

Because the enlightened despot is charged with the public good, opposition to government policy is an offense against authority, and thus against the state itself and all that it represented: the concept of loyal opposition is incompatible within this political framework. Because public dissent is forbidden, dissent is inevitably secret. To police dissent, therefore, requires use of informers and secret police.

Liberal democracy, with its emphasis on the rule of law, focused on the fact that the police state was unrestrained by law. Robert von Mohl, who first introduced the rule of law into German jurisprudence, for example, contrasted the Rechtsstaat ("legal" or "constitutional" state) with the aristocratic Polizeistaat ("police state").

No state ever claims to be a "police state", the term is always applied by critics of the state, based on differing perceptions of legitimate law, human rights and social contract. [edit]

The police state in literature

The best-known literary treatment of the police state is George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, which describes life under a totalitarian régime that uses the constant presence of eternal war as a pretext for subjecting the people to mass surveillance, constraining both freedom of action and of thought.

A police state is a totalitarian state regulated by secret police; the police exercise power on behalf of the executive and the conduct of the police cannot be effectively challenged. In such regimes there is no significant distinction between the law and the will of the executive; there is no rule of law.

Under the political model of enlightened despotism, the ruler is the "highest servant of the state". The ruler exercises the absolute power that he enjoys to provide for the general welfare. All of the powers of the state are to be directed toward this end; to constrain the ruler with written law would be bad policy. This view was supported by such thinkers as Voltaire and Jean-Jacques Rousseau .

Because the enlightened despot is charged with the public good, opposition to government policy is an offense against authority, and thus against the state itself and all that it represented: the concept of loyal opposition is incompatible within this political framework. Because public dissent is forbidden, dissent is inevitably secret. To police dissent, therefore, requires use of informers and secret police.

Liberal democracy, with its emphasis on the rule of law, focused on the fact that the police state was unrestrained by law. Robert von Mohl, who first introduced the rule of law into German jurisprudence, for example, contrasted the Rechtsstaat ("legal" or "constitutional" state) with the aristocratic Polizeistaat ("police state").

No state ever claims to be a "police state", the term is always applied by critics of the state, based on differing perceptions of legitimate law, human rights and social contract. [edit]

The police state in literature

The best-known literary treatment of the police state is George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, which describes life under a totalitarian régime that uses the constant presence of eternal war as a pretext for subjecting the people to mass surveillance, constraining both freedom of action and of thought. George Orwell:

//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Orwell
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